Posted by: Kiran Vaidya | April 8, 2008

Sarus Crane

Yesterday I was watching a documentary on The Ganges on Discovery channel. The Ganges is the lifeline of millions of Indians. Lakhs of hectares of paddy plantations are alongside the river Ganga. The Sarus Crane thrives on such paddy fields and also in protected bird sanctuaries in Indian subcontinent. The Sarus crane is the tallest flying bird in the world with a height which can reach more than 6ft. (taller than me )

The name “Sarus” comes from Sanskrit which means courtship. The males (as always) dance to attract the females and then both of them then dance together. The Sarus cranes are almost always observed in pairs. In fact the Sarus cranes are a symbol of love as they mate for life. They are one of the most loyal and faithful species. It is also said that if one of the crane dies then its partner never mates again.

The nests are built on ground and are protected by both the parents together however the males are the main protectors. The hatchlings follow their parents from day one of their birth. It has been observed that the males even drive away cattle which venture close to their nests.

The species is venerated in India and legend has it that Valmiki cursed a hunter for killing a Sarus Crane and was then inspired to write the epic Ramayana. In the earlier times the birds were considered as holy by farmers and their arrival was a sign of good faith and fertility. However today less than 20,000 adults are remaining globally and half of it are present in India. They are classified under “Vulnerable” which means that the population has declined by a third since 1980. If steps are not taken fast by our Govt. then this great bird might be extinct by 2020.


Some of the other species that mate for life are Gibbon apes, wolves, termites, coyotes, barn owls, beavers, bald eagles, golden eagles, condors, swans, brolga cranes, French angel fish, sandhill cranes, pigeons, prions (a seabird), red-tailed hawks, anglerfish, ospreys, prairie voles (a rodent), and black vultures

PS: This post is published using ScribeFire which is a blog editor for WordPress and an addon which integrates in FireFox.

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Responses

  1. I used ScribeFire once too! It is good when you are researching an article online, no?

    Surprising how you left “Sarus baug” out of this one. How come?

  2. :).. had been to saras baug in my childhood. There is one big lake in between the garden and a ganpati temple. (Talyatla ganpati). PMC should fill the lake with water and harvest fish in it. This will attract the sarus cranes to the garden and will help increase their population. Then we can rename the garden from Saras baug to Sarus baug 🙂 .

  3. @ Kiran: Saras Baug lake has fish in it…Pretty big ones. Seems like ur childhood was a long time ago when these fish were there but not big enough to attaract “Sarus Crane”.

    PS: I cant believe it I wrote the above comment…I have got into kiranism…..Its scary….

  4. @seema: i know, i know.. “kiranisms”..they r so very addictive 🙂

  5. @seema: nahi ga.. i remember once reading the newspapers that the water in the lake has dried up..

  6. @avadhut: which blog editor do u use?

  7. “Veda Raghu” la kahich footage nahi..
    Savtra kela tyala..

    According to Kiran thr is bird called “Veda Raghu” ;)))

  8. @manmit: web references for veda raghu –

    http://parnad.blogspot.com/2007/12/veda-raghui-guess.html

    http://www.ncl-india.org/aboutncl/florafauna/aboutncl_visitingncl_nclcampus_ff_fauna.jsp

    now what u have to say on this ..

  9. All I can say is that you lied—you still are on bench. How else do you explain the availability of time to do something as trivial as search online for references regarding “veda raghu,” however fabled he maybe.

  10. majhi comment kuthe geli…khodlis ka??

  11. @mukul: tuzhi comment “pomfret fry” chya post var aahe..

  12. @ Mukul: Khodlis ka LOL :D………

    @Kiran: Kiranism is not addictive… Its pathetic….. N like to pathetic sometimes….

    @ Manmit: Rambo circus ani veda raghu kon aahe?


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